The In’s and Out’s of Moving to Ireland

Pre Planning 


Prior to moving to Ireland, I had done my fair share of research on accommodation, culture, jobs etc., to help prepare me for the move. I read a lot about how in Dublin it was tough to find accommodation and that Cork had a more options at more reasonable prices. I did all I could to ensure that I wouldn’t be screwed over once I got there (I am somewhat anal and OCD about that kinda stuff). Some of the things I had come across online such as difficulties around affordable housing and how Ireland was slowly coming back from a recession which would make it hard to find a job, were true to some extent.

The Arrival


When I first arrived in Dublin, I had completed all the paperwork/documents that USIT provided to me. They helped me a great deal with any questions that I had about bank accounts, accommodation, PPS# etc. I felt that if I were more prepared, the less scary the orientation would be and I could spend more time listening and asking appropriate questions instead of feeling anxious. My biggest take away from the welcome orientation with USIT was to be organized! Prior to leaving your home country –  make sure you have your meeting with the GARDA bureau scheduled (appointments are essential in Dublin – and they allow bookings to be made up to 6 weeks in advance. Cork allows for walk-ins and is usually less busy). The GARDA appointment took almost 2 hours (even with an appointment) and cost €300 only payable by credit card. They ask you a few questions and take your photo and then issue you the GNIB card. This card is important as it allows you to legally work in the country and you can start to look for work right away.

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However, Ireland still requires you to apply for your PPS# as well (think of it as a Social Insurance Number). This # is crucial because it puts you into their tax system, which allows them to keep track of your income, in which then they can tax you accordingly. A lot of employers prefer that you have this number already, because it is a bit of a hassle to hire someone who doesn’t have one. In order to do this properly, once you get your PPS#, you have to go to revenue.ie and fill out a tax certificate form in which you answer quite a few questions ( and then they issue your employer a tax certificate. When they get this tax certificate in the mail (they like to do everything by post), that is when they will be able to take you off of emergency tax.

Finding Work


The first thing I would recommend doing after you’ve received your GNIB card is to look for a job. Send out as many CVs you can, as that’ll give you more chances to receive an email back from someone. USIT was very helpful in fine tuning my CV (CV formats differ from country to country). The USIT office also had plenty of job listings posted in their office. The faster you find a job, the quicker you will be able to apply for a PPS#; since it is required that you have a job offer letter from an employer stating that you have been offered a job and will be working with that company. 

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Most employers will not know all the information that is needed on the job offer letter, so it is important to let them know exactly what you need them to write in order to make the offer letter valid. The Intreo office is in the city centre of Cork and is open during regular office hours. You walk in, take a number and meet with someone to make sure you have all the appropriate documents. The proof of address can be given in a form of a utility bill OR a utility bill with the landlord’s name or an approved letter by USIT. You CANNOT get a PPS number without a proof of address. 

Accommodation


Accommodation sign with a beautiful day

When I first arrived in Cork, I had arranged a stay with a fellow participant who I met through the Facebook group. I chose this option instead of staying at a hostel because I wanted privacy and I didn’t want to look for a job while living out of a hostel. Also, it was much cheaper and felt more “homey” if you will. Once we were settled in, I began looking for a job right away. Luckily, I was able to find a job in just over a week. This was possible because there are plenty of jobs in the  hospitality industry. Once I started my job, I asked for a job offer letter right away. This was because I had gone to see many house showings but were quickly turned down due to the fact that my boyfriend and I both did not have jobs yet. Obviously, not many landlords would be comfortable with tenants who did not have jobs. The main websites that I used to look for accommodation was rent.ie and daft.ie. I emailed as many listings as I could and went to as many showings as I could. The market at the moment is ridiculous. Luckily, after a week and a half of searching, we found a landlord who was happy with only one of us having a job and allowed us to move in. We got a 6 bedroom house right in the city centre. However, it is a shared house with 6 other people. This may sound crazy, but the house is big enough with more than enough space and is renovated new with added bathrooms/en suites. BUT – our rent is incredibly high still (This is the reality of the housing crisis at the moment). If I could give some advice, it would be to join a group on Facebook about finding housing in Ireland and there are people who are posting about looking for flatmates regularly. Be prepared to live with other people. Be prepared to pay a lot for rent. And be prepared to look outside of the city for accommodation. Whatever you decide, just do not get discouraged and continue to look until you find a place. Cork is not that big and you can get to most places walking in 30 mins or less. Once you find a place, you might have to pay for additional fees such as refuse (garbage/recycling), electricity and wifi and cable. These expenses are not always covered by the landlord/owner. Now that I’ve been settled into my place for a month now, I can honestly say I love it and it’s really starting to feel like home. We bought some things to decorate our room and all of our housemates clean/friendly. Luckily, we had an option of signing either a 6 month or 12 month lease. Some places require a minimum of 12 months, but a lot of people find other tenants to take over their lease over if need be. Now, the reason I was so eager to find a place was because I knew I needed a proof of address for  my PPS #. Also, in order to open a bank account – you need a proof of address and that requires a letter from revenue in which you can only get once you get your PPS #. Finally, I registered my PPS # with revenue and received a letter from them with my NAME and ADDRESS (valid for the bank) and my employer received a tax certificate in which they were finally able to take me off emergency tax. So, as you can see, this step is critical. Also, when I made the appointment for the PPS #, it was made for 2 weeks later. So be prepared to have to wait a bit for the bank account. So, the quicker you get all this done, the better. I arrived in Cork on August 3rd, and started my job on August 10th. I moved into my house on August 12th and received my PPS # on August 23rd. I received my letter from from revenue and opened my bank account on September 4th (but didn’t get my card in the Post until September 12th). So, all in all, even with preparation and research – it still took me roughly a month to settle in and get all my ducks in order.

This can be stressful, but if you’re organized and prepared financially (such as having some extra money to live off of while you look for a job) will be very helpful! Once it’s all dealt with, it finally starts to feel real and you can enjoy your hard earned money!

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Blog Post By Current Work in Ireland Participant: Michelle To.

Keep up with Michelle’s Ireland Adventures on her Blog: Just Swell. 

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Lifetime Lessons and Lifelong Friends

“It’s been almost 6 months now that I’ve been living in Dublin as part of the Work in Ireland program. Time sure does fly by. So far, it has definitely had its ups and downs, but I always remind myself in the tougher times that this experience is once in a lifetime and there are so many life lessons I am learning while over here. Not to mention, the craic in Dublin is great!!

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After first getting here, I have to admit I was very overwhelmed, especially with finding housing and a job – the main priorities. I had a friend who was coming over to work in Ireland at the same time as me, so we decided to be roommates and at first, we were getting discouraged about finding an apartment. However, after sending plenty of emails on rent.ie and daft.ie, we finally found a suitable apartment in a suburb north of Dublin city centre. We have a nice little set up with a balcony and a lovely kitchen. Rent is a bit pricey, but we expected that when coming to live in the capital of Ireland.

As far as finding a job, it definitely was not the easiest task at first. I reached out to a few different recruitment agencies and spent the first week or two in the USIT office polishing up my CV and sending it off to employers. It would be discouraging after not hearing back or after getting rejected, but I tried to be positive and remember it would all work out one way or another.

I found an agency and they called me the day after receiving my CV. I had a good feeling about it and went in to interview the next day. I met with the manager there who told me that he would do his best to get me work as soon as possible. Well, turns out that he had work for me the very next day. He rang me in the morning to come in to the Bank to help out on the switchboard for the day. This assignment turned into an essentially full-time temporary role, and I have since got hired full-time through the Bank as a Business Services Assistant where I work in the reception department. I think my advice to anyone in this program would be to take advantage of agencies because they can be very helpful with finding work quickly for you, at least to start with when you first arrive.

As far as everything else, my experience has been great getting to travel around Ireland a bit as well as some of Europe. So far, I’ve been to Waterford, Belfast, and the Netherlands, and I have a few trips planned coming up including Barcelona, which I’m really looking forward to!

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Overall, Dublin is a lovely place to live with plenty to do and with friendly people all around. I really enjoy exploring all of the coastal villages along Dublin Bay as there are so extremely beautiful towns just waiting to be explored. I feel very content now that I am all settled and in my work routine. Surely there are some things I wish I did differently in the beginning, but life is about learning from your mistakes and moving on.

Cheers to an amazing city and cheers to the second half of my adventure on this side of the pond!”

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Blog Post & Photography by Valerie Stearns, a current Work in Ireland Participant.

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